One of the hidden powers of your late-night visualisation routine is that it shapes our dreams.

That can bring focus, and also solutions to the agenda that you have already assimilated in the earlier part of your routine.

Our brain is a powerful machine, and the imagination of dreaming exercises neurokinetic pathways that play out in the way we go about the subject of our dreams.

Champion golfers, karate champions and tennis players all know that.

So I have no doubt that developing a strong visualisation technique would be gainful. I’ll give it a try, thanks for the reference to the book.

By the way, something I don’t recommend as a bedtime ritual is downing a protein shake — at least, not in the expectation that it will help you lose weight!

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Optimistically curious, 70+ trail runner; 2X cancer; diabetic; Click “FOLLOW” for living longer better tips | Weekly Newsletter 👉 wja.is/newsletter

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Walter Adamson

Walter Adamson

Optimistically curious, 70+ trail runner; 2X cancer; diabetic; Click “FOLLOW” for living longer better tips | Weekly Newsletter 👉 wja.is/newsletter

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